Northland Motorsports

Home | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Public Notices | Galleries | Milestones | Contact Us | Subscribe | e-newsletter | RSS | GrandCanyonTourGuide.com
Navajo-Hopi Observer | Flagstaff, Arizona

home : latest news : local August 1, 2014


6/17/2014 10:27:00 AM
Obama visits Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota
Visit makes Obama third sitting American president to visit an Indian reservation
President Barack Obama talks with Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II (left) with first lady Michelle Obama June 13 during the Cannon Ball Flag Day Celebration. Obama is the third sitting American president to visit an Indian reservation. Photo/Screen shot  www.whitehouse.gov
President Barack Obama talks with Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II (left) with first lady Michelle Obama June 13 during the Cannon Ball Flag Day Celebration. Obama is the third sitting American president to visit an Indian reservation. Photo/Screen shot www.whitehouse.gov

Katherine Locke
Reporter


CANNON BALL, N.D. - President Barack Obama became the third sitting American president to visit an Indian reservation Friday when he participated in the Cannon Ball Flag Day Celebration at Standing Rock reservation June 13.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe is located in North and South Dakota. While the people of Standing Rock are often called Sioux, they are members of the Dakota and Lakota nations. The term Sioux dates back to the 17th century and was a term French traders used.

Chairman Dave Archambault II greeted Obama by quoting Sitting Bull, who was a tribal chief of the Sitting Rock Indian reservation, who said, "If you have an honest man in Washington, send him here. I want to talk to him."

Archambault said Obama's visit would have pleased Sitting Bull and that no other president has come close to helping Indian Country more than Obama has.

Six students from the Lakota immersion program sang the Sioux Flag Day song to the president and first lady Michelle Obama in Lakota and youth groups danced for the president and first lady in front of hundreds of onlookers.

Obama thanked all the veterans in the crowd and those who have walked on whose flags were proudly displayed at the powwow grounds.

"Thank you and to your families for your extraordinary service," Obama said. "We are very, very grateful."

Obama also said throughout history, the U.S. often did not give the nation-to-nation relationship between the U.S. government and Indian nations the respect that it deserved. He said he promised to be a president who would honor the sacred trust, respect the sovereignty of Indian nations, uphold treaty obligations and work with Indian nations in the spirit of true partnership, in mutual respect, to give the children the future they deserve.

"My administration is determined to partner with tribes, and it's not something that just happens once in a while," Obama said. "It takes place every day, on just about every issue that touches your lives. And that's what real nation-to-nation partnerships look like."

He also said the powwow was not just about celebrating the past but looking to the future and about keeping the sacred trust alive for the next generation - the children.

"So here today, I want to focus on the work that lies ahead," Obama said. "And I think we can follow the lead of Standing Rock's most famous resident, Chief Sitting Bull. He said, 'Let's put our minds together to see what we can build for our children.'"

Before he spoke, the president and first lady met with a group of young people who spoke about the challenges of living in two worlds, both "Native" and "American." He said that while there are challenges for Native American youth, challenges that he was familiar with, the kids should not give up.

"There's no denying that for some Americans the deck has been stacked against them, sometimes for generations," Obama said. "And that's been the case for many Native Americans. But if we're working together, we can make things better. We can give our children a better future. I know because I've talked to these young people. I know they'll be leaders not just in Indian Country but across America."






    Recently Commented     Most Viewed
Letter: What does the term 'Navajo' really mean?
Down and dirty: Cameron community members clean up closed transfer station
Letters to the editor: Developers don't respect the holy and sacred
Developers say Escalade project at Colorado River confluence on track
'Art allowed me to survive'




Article Comment Submission Form
Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. The email and phone info you provide will not be visible to the public. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comments are limited to 1300 characters or less. In order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit your comment entries to five(5) per day.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search

HSE - We want to hear from you
Find more about Weather in Flagstaff, AZ
Click for weather forecast





Submission links
 •  Submit site feedback or questions

Find It Opinions Features Extras Submit Other Publications
Home | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Public Notices | Galleries | Milestones | Contact Us | Subscribe | e-newsletter | RSS | Site Map
Larry Green

© Copyright 2014 Western News&Info, Inc.® The Navajo-Hopi Observer is the information source for the Navajo and Hopi Nations and Winslow area communities in Northern Arizona. Original content may not be reprinted or distributed without the written permission of Western News&Info, Inc.® Navajo-Hopi Observer Online is a service of WNI. By using the Site, nhonews.com ®, you agree to abide and be bound by the site's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which prohibit commercial use of any information on the site. Click here to submit your questions, comments or suggestions. Navajo-Hopi Observer Online is a proud publication of Western News&Info Inc.® All Rights Reserved.

Software © 1998-2014 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved